Where is Your Peridot From?

August 15, 2019

Peridot Gemstone

Most larger crystals of peridot are found in veins or pockets within solidified molten rock that come to the surface of the earth via lava flows. A number of countries in the world are good sources of peridot, including but not limited to the United States, Finland, Pakistan, and upper Myanmar (Burma) in the northeast of Mogok.

Pakistan Peridot

Peridot from Pakistan – Photo courtesy of Kingstone Gems

 

Burmese Peridot

Peridot from Burma – Photo courtesy of www.burmesegems.com

 

For more than 3,500 years, the Island of St. John, also known as the Isle of Zabargad, has been an important and historically significant source of peridot. Today, one of the biggest modern sources is the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona.

 

Peridot from the Isle of Zabargad from 300 B.C. – Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Peridot from the Isle of Zabargad from 300 B.C. – Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Peridot from the San Carlos Apache Reservation - Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Peridot from the San Carlos Apache Reservation – Photo courtesy of Heritage Auctions, HA.com



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